How do we test cars?

It would take much time to take every new vehicle out on the road and to measure its fuel consumption  This tests fall into FTP (Federal Test Procedure) category. Every vehicle being tested is connected to something called chassis dynamometer. This machine is programmed to calculate fuel consumption. Two simulations are performed, one for the city drive and one for the highway drive.

The results are usually very precise.

Simulated city course

The city test simulates a 12-km, stop-and-go trip with an average speed of 32 km/hour (km/h) and a top speed of 91 km/h. The test runs for 23 minutes and includes 18 stops. About four minutes of test time are spent idling, to represent waiting at traffic lights. The test begins from a cold engine start, which is similar to starting a vehicle after it has been parked overnight during the summer. When the test is completed, the test cycle starts again with a hot engine start, and the first eight minutes of the test are repeated. This simulates restarting a vehicle after it has been warmed up, driven and then stopped for a short time.

Simulated highway course

The highway test simulates a 16-km trip with an average speed of
77 km/h and a top speed of 97 km/h. The test runs for 13 minutes and does not include any stops. However, the speed varies to simulate different kinds of highway and rural roads. The test begins from a hot engine start.

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